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Why I Don’t Play Games At Release

I like to think that my time is fairly precious. I work, am pursuing a Master’s degree, socialize a bit and write blog posts that a handful of people read. At some point during this daily grind of activity, I also manage to squeeze in a few hours to play games. Out of all of these pursuits, I feel the worst when my time is wasted with a terrible game.

Modern games are both blessed and cursed with the ability to make changes after release. This means that the latest super hot game you spent your $65 on will most likely not be the game that you replay in two years. This is a long way from the original cartridge system where what you buy is what you get.

Problems occur when studios want to get a game out, possibly riding a wave of hype; without properly testing to ensure that the final product is actually good. The excuse is generally ‘it’s ok, the game will constantly be updated to improve playability.’ This really sucks if you’re someone who preordered at full price, waiting for release day only to find out that it’s not what you wanted. Fast forward two months and the same game is sitting at your local big box for $20. Not a good look.

There’s no shame in waiting a few months to get into a game. In the meantime, my backlog is so huge that these studios are probably doing me a favor anyway. Maybe I’ll finally try Fallout 76 next year.

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